Université d'Auvergne Clermont1 | CNRS

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Motor cortex stimulation does not improve dystonia secondary to a focal basal ganglia lesion.

TitleMotor cortex stimulation does not improve dystonia secondary to a focal basal ganglia lesion.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2014
AuthorsRieu, I., M. Aya Kombo, S. Thobois, P. Derost, P. Pollak, J. Xie, B. Pereira, M. Vidailhet, P. Burbaud, J. P. Lefaucheur, J. J. Lemaire, P. Mertens, S. Chabardes, E. Broussolle, and F. Durif
JournalNeurology
Volume82
Issue2
Pagination156-62
Date Published2014 Jan 14
Type of ArticleACL
ISSN1526-632X
KeywordsAdult, Age of Onset, Aged, Basal Ganglia Diseases, Cross-Over Studies, Double-Blind Method, Dystonia, Electric Stimulation Therapy, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Motor Cortex, Muscle Spasticity, Neuropsychological Tests, Pain, Pain Management, Pain Measurement, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Young Adult
Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of epidural motor cortex stimulation (MCS) on dystonia, spasticity, pain, and quality of life in patients with dystonia secondary to a focal basal ganglia (BG) lesion.

METHODS: In this double-blind, crossover, multicenter study, 5 patients with dystonia secondary to a focal BG lesion were included. Two quadripolar leads were implanted epidurally over the primary motor (M1) and premotor cortices, contralateral to the most dystonic side. The leads were placed parallel to the central sulcus. Only the posterior lead over M1 was activated in this study. The most lateral or medial contact of the lead (depending on whether the dystonia predominated in the upper or lower limb) was selected as the anode, and the other 3 as cathodes. One month postoperatively, patients were randomly assigned to on- or off-stimulation for 3 months each, with a 1-month washout between the 2 conditions. Voltage, frequency, and pulse width were fixed at 3.8 V, 40 Hz, and 60 μs, respectively. Evaluations of dystonia (Burke-Fahn-Marsden Scale), spasticity (Ashworth score), pain intensity (visual analog scale), and quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey) were performed before surgery and after each period of stimulation.

RESULTS: Burke-Fahn-Marsden Scale, Ashworth score, pain intensity, and quality of life were not statistically significantly modified by MCS.

CONCLUSIONS: Bipolar epidural MCS failed to improve any clinical feature in dystonia secondary to a focal BG lesion.

CLASSIFICATION OF EVIDENCE: This study provides Class I evidence that bipolar epidural MCS with the anode placed over the motor representation of the most affected limb failed to improve any clinical feature in dystonia secondary to a focal BG lesion.

DOI10.1212/WNL.0000000000000012
Alternate JournalNeurology